Course 204
Continuous Case Seminar

Course Description

Instructors
Theodore J. Jacobs, M.D.
Robert Penzer, M.D.
September 11, 2017 - February 26, 2018
Mondays, 7:00 - 8:25 PM
Co-requisites
Candidates must have at least one case in supervised psychoanalysis to be eligible to take second year courses.
Course Description
The seminar will introduce students to clinical psychoanalytic work by means of ongoing process notes from a beginning case, presented weekly. Based on knowledge gained in courses #105 and #106, and on their own clinical experience, students will have the opportunity to actively discuss the clinical situation as it unfolds. Topics will include modes of analytic listening, the formulation and timing of analytic interventions, as well as problems of the initial phase of analysis.

No class held 10/9, 12/25, 1/1, 1/15. 2/19.

Syllabus 2017 - 2018
Readings are posted.

Session 1: Introduction to the Psychoanalytic Situation
Brenner, C. (2006) Psychoanalysis or mind and meaning. Psychoanalytic Quarterly Monograph, Chap. 1 & 2 (students to purchase book)

Session 2:
Brenner, C. (2006) Chap. 3 & 4

Session 3:
Brenner, C. (2006) Chap. 5 & epilogue

Session 4:
Brenner, C. (2006) Appendix 1 & 2

Session 5:
Brenner, C. (2006) Appendix 3, 4, 5

Session 6:
Loewald, H. (1960) On the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis. Int. Journal of Psa., 41:16-33.

Session 7:
Poland, W. (1996). Transference: An original creation. In: Melting the Darkness, pp.35-55. Jason Aronson, NY.

Session 8:
Coltart, N. (1996) Handling the transference. In: The Baby and the Bathwater. Karnac Publishers.

Session 9:
Faimberg, H. (2005). Listening to listening. In: The Telescoping of Generations. New Library of Psychoanalysis.

Session 10:
McLaughlin, J. (1988). The analyst's insights. Psa. Q., 57:370-388.

Session 11:
Bollas, C. (1987) Expressive uses of the countertransference. In: The Shadow of the Object. New York: Columbia University Press. Chap. 12.

Session 12:
Casement, P. (1985). Forms of interactive communication. In: Learning from the Patient. New York: Guilford Press. Chap. 4.

Session 13:
Arlow, J. (1995). Stilted listening. Psychoanalysis as discourse. Psa. Q. 64:215-233.

Schwaber, E. (1992). Countertransference: The analyst's retreat from the patient's
vantage point. Psa. Q., 73:349-361

Session 14:
Renik, O. (1993) Analytic Interaction: Conceptualizing Technique in Light of the Analyst's Irreducible Subjectivity. Psa. Q., 82:553-571.

Session 15:
Jacobs, T. (1999) On the question of Self Disclosure: Error or Advance in Technique. Psa. Q., 58/2.

Session 16:
Smith, H. (1999). Countertransference, conflictual listening and the analytic object r\ Relationship. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 48/1:95-126.

Session 17:
Aron, L. (1991). The patient's experience of the analyst's subjectivity. Psychoanal. Dialogues., 1/1:29-51.

Session 18:
Kohut, H. (1984). How Does Analysis Cure? Chap. 6. University of Chicago Press.

Ogden, T.H. (2004). The analytic third: Implications for psychoanalytic theory and Technique. Psa. Q., 73:167-195.

Session 19:
Hoffman, I. (2006) Forging difference out of similarity; the multiplicity of corrective experience, Psa. Q., 75:715-751.

Session 20:
Treurniet, N. (1993) What is psychoanalysis now? Int. J. Psychoanal., 74:873-891.
Evaluation Method
Each student's participation in class discussion and his or her demonstration of understanding of the course objectives and reading material is assessed in a written evaluation by the instructor(s).
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •