Course 207
Introduction to Child and Adolescent Analysis

Course Description

Instructors
Daniel W. Prezant, Ph.D.
Kirsten Butterfield, Psy.D.
October 16, 2017 - December 4, 2017
Mondays, 8:30 - 10:00 PM
Co-requisites
Candidates must have at least one case in supervised psychoanalysis to be eligible to take second year courses.
Course Description
The goal of this course is to introduce you to child and adolescent psychoanalysis from historical, theoretical, technical and clinical perspectives. There will be a consideration of how child analysis informs the work of the adult analyst. The contributions of Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, Melanie Klein, Berta Bornstein and D.W. Winnicott will be studied. With that theoretical base in mind, we will explore the special technical issues that arise in working with children: the centrality of play and the manifestations of transference-countertransference, how meaning is found and made, and the vicissitudes of affect in child analysis. Clinical cases will be reviewed both to clarify the theoretical points and to show the child analyst at work.

No class held 10/9.

Syllabus 2017 - 2018
Not yet posted.
Course Objectives
After attending this course, students will be able to:
1. Describe the theoretical and technical aspects of child analysis​
2. Describe how child analysis informs the work of the adult analyst.
3. Explain how transference is worked with in child analysis.
4. Describe the contributions of Freud, Anna Freud, Bornstein, Klein, and Winnicott to child analysis.
Evaluation Method
Each student's participation in class discussion and his or her demonstration of understanding of the course objectives and reading material is assessed in a written evaluation by the instructor(s).
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •