Course 406
Affects and Affect Pathology

Course Description

Instructors
Leon Hoffman, M.D., Carlos Almeida, Jr., M.D.,
Norman Straker, M.D.
September 11, 2017 - November 13, 2017
Mondays, 8:30 - 10:00 PM
Co-requisites
Candidates must have or have had at least two cases in supervised psychoanalysis to be eligible for upper level courses.
Course Description
This course will consider some of the major directions in attempts to define and theorize about affect within psychoanalysis, and also take a brief look at how affect has been approached in other disciplines such as neuroscience and philosophy. We will examine affect’s central role in adaptive/ maladaptive patterns, through thinking about the concepts of mood and affect tolerance and consider various affects that are central to the clinical encounter. The course will end with a review of the adaptive and maladaptive responses to loss. Third and fourth year students combined.

No class held 10/9.

Syllabus 2017 - 2018

Readings are posted.
Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1) Define the term affect as delineated by classical ego psychologists, attachment and mentalization based theorists, Kleinians, and Object Relations theorists, and Self Psychologists.
2) Describe how neuroscience has contributed to our psychoanalytic understanding of affect.
3) Explain the concepts of mood and affect tolerance and use them to identify the central role of affect in adaptive/maladaptive patterns.
Evaluation Method
Each student's participation in class discussion and his or her demonstration of understanding of the course objectives and reading material is assessed in a written evaluation by the instructor(s).
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •