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  • “Works in Progress” Seminar Series

    Two Psychology Trainees Discuss Their Dissertations

    Wednesday, September 7, 2016
    8:00 PM

    This works in progress seminar will be devoted to presentations by two NYPSI trainees who will discuss their dissertations and research.

    Diana Hofshi: "Implicit and Explicit Homonegativity: A Process Dissociation Approach"

    Shia Bochner: "The influence of adult attachment style on marital satisfaction in Hasidic/arranged marriages and the impact of marital expectations on the quality of marriage"

    No charge. All are welcome.

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Diana Hofshi studied performing arts at Mannes College of Music and Ward Studio and Comparative Literature at Brown University before discovering her passion for psychology. Her doctoral program in clinical psychology at Adelphi University has offered training with diverse populations in varied clinical situations, including work in trauma and substance abuse, inpatient work, consultation-liaison, couples counseling, and group therapy. She is particularly interested in unconscious processes and sexual identity, in both the consulting room and in the research lab. She is delighted to join NYPSI as a postdoctoral fellow this fall.

    Shia Bochner is a student at Fielding Graduate University. He is from a small Hamlet called Borough Park (while technically situated in the United States, it is a universe of its own). His passion for psychology has been with him from a very young age, although, at the time, he did not know what the word “psychology” meant. He believes himself fortunate to have realized an unlikely dream and to be at the final step of completing his PhD.
    Ms. Hofshi's present study examines moderators of the relationship between implicit homonegative bias and explicit homonegative bias, utilizing a process-dissociation approach. Specifically, this study examined religious fundamentalism; disgust propensity and sensitivity; and socially desirable responding as potential moderators.

    Mr. Bochner's dissertation looks at adult attachment style as a predictor of (or influence on) marital satisfaction in Hasidic/arranged marriages. Additionally, expectation for marital intimacy as a possible mediator between adult attachment style and marital satisfaction is explored. A Hasidic group who practices arranged marriages is compared with a Jewish orthodox population who marry largely based on romantic interest.

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •