Archives


Archives
The Archives of NYPSI consist of eight record groups: I) Society records, 1911 to 1946; II) Institute records, 1931 to 1946; III) Society records, 1965; IV) Institute records, 1946-1965; V) Joint Activities of the Society and Institute; VI) A.A. Brill Library records, 1932-1982; VII) Treatment Center records; VIII) Kris Study Group records, 1954-1979.

Guide to the Archives
The date of division for the record groups is 1946, since that year marked the official split of the Society and Institute into two organizations. This change had been considered for at least six years, particularly when confusion arose over the jurisdiction or handling of monies. The legal change was effected fairly abruptly at a meeting on June 5, 1946; however this is not strictly the case with the actual records. There is naturally some overlap and ambiguity in the 1944-1947 period. For example, a series in Record Group III or IV, which cover 1946-1965, may contain papers from 1945 if it was appropriate to include them.

From 1911 until 1931 the Society had no governing board. The members and officers (President, Vice-President, and Secretary-Treasurer) met jointly. A three-member council existed to transact all routine business not of a scientific nature. The records of the joint meetings are in Record Group I, Series 2, Meetings of the Society, 1911-1946.

In 1931 the Institute was established, and with it a Board of Directors. Although there were now two entities with separate charters, by-laws and purposes, the officers and board members were the same for both. Society members were also automatically members of the Institute.

Membership meetings of the entire Society continued, as shown in Record Group I, Series 2. Once a year the Society met under the aegis of the Institute; minutes of these annual meetings are in Record Group II, Series 2. The Board of Directors began to convene and keep minutes apart from the membership. These records are contained in Record Group II, Series 1 Ð Meetings of the Board of Directors of the Society and Institute, 1933-1945.

As the Institute began to enter the public eye and grow more complex, the Board realized the need to legally separate the executive aspects of the two groups. Therefore, in 1946 a new Board was elected for the Institute, known as the Trustees and also a separate set of officers. Following legal advice, the Institute took on certain activities that had been the province of the Society, such as fund-raising.
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •