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  • “Works in Progress” Seminar Series

    Two Psychology Trainees Discuss Their Dissertations

    Wednesday, September 9, 2015
    8:00 PM

    This works in progress seminar will be devoted to presentations by two NYPSI trainees who will discuss their dissertations and research.

    Rachel Khurgin, M.A..: "Disclosure to Spouses: What patients reveal and conceal about their individual psychotherapy"

    Hannah Knafo, M.A.: "The intergenerational transmission of body image: From mothers to their elementary school aged daughters"

    FREE. All are welcome.

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Rachel Khurgin-Bott is a clinical psychology Ph.D. candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she has also obtained her Masters degrees in Clinical Psychology and in Psychological Counseling. Rachel has been a part of NYPSI as a psychology extern, intern, and fellow, and has completed the Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Program. She has also received training in the psychology of mother-child dyads at the Anna Freud Center in London. Her research interests include self-disclosure, psychotherapy process and outcome, interpersonal intimacy in marriage and other intimate relationships, and psychotherapy in fiction and film. Her articles on self-disclosure in the therapy of patients with a history of childhood abuse, as well as on disclosure about psychotherapy to confidants, have been published in Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice and Training. She conducts psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and adults.

    Hannah Knafo is a clinical doctoral student at The New School and currently a psychology extern at NYPSI. Working with Drs. Howard and Miriam Steele at The Center for Attachment Research, Hannah has studied the intergenerational transmission of body image for the past five years as part of a team that calls itself "The Body Group". The Body Group research uses a unique paradigm developed by Paulina Kernberg (2006) called "The Mirror Interview". Based on Winnicott's theories of the "mother as mirror" and attachment theory, the mirror paradigm assesses the individual's self-representation and body image, as it relates to his/her attachment representations. Hannah's dissertation research is titled "The Intergenerational Transmission of Body Image: From Mothers to their Elementary School-Aged Daughters". Her research evaluates the interview narratives and mirror behaviors of mothers and their five- to seven-year old daughters.

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •