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    The Psychological Origins of Religious Ideas

    Wednesday, June 1, 2016
    8:00 PM

    "The Psychological Origins of Religious Ideas" with Dr. Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi

    Why are religious ideas, i.e. ideas of souls and spirits, so eminently attractive and plausible to humans? Defenders of any of the thousands of religions on earth will assert that religions appear when humans respond to some transcendent reality, or to unique and dramatic personal experiences.

    This presentation will survey an undeclared theoretical competition among those seeking to explain religion by relating it to the most elementary, early, and universal psychological processes. It will touch on ideas proposed in the 1960s by those promoting the notion of psychedelic experiences, as well as ideas proposed by Freud, Piaget, Bowlby, Winnicott, and the modern cognitive-anthropological school. Modern theorizing about supernaturalism as a consequence of universal cognitive mechanisms follows a long tradition of locating the sacred not "out there", but inside the psyche. It also emphasizes the normality and ubiquity of the mental processes leading to religious beliefs.

    No CME/CE credits offered

    RSVP is closed for this event.
    Contact Sharon Weller for additional information at 212-879-7050.

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Michigan State University in 1970, and has held clinical, research, and teaching positions at the University of Michigan, Central Michigan University, Michigan State University, the University of Pennsylvania, New York University, Columbia University, Vassar College, University of Haifa, the Israel Institute of Technology, Tel-Aviv University, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, King's College London, and CNRS in Paris. He is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of 21 books and 180 articles and book chapters on the psychology of religion, social identity, and personality development. His most recent books are Psychoanalysis and Theism: Critical Reflections on the Grunbaum Thesis (2010) and Psychological Perspectives on Religion and Religiosity (2015).

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •