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    An Alternative Conception of Termination and Follow-up

    Wednesday, June 5, 2013
    8:30 PM

    "An Alternative Conception of Termination and Follow-up" with Joseph Schachter, M.D., Ph.D.

    Donations Accepted

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Traditional psychoanalytic theory prescribes total patient-analyst separation after termination to facilitate mourning the loss of the analyst. This paper provides a rationale derived from contemporary (especially relational/interpersonal) theory for an alternative conception of termination and follow-up based on the central role of the analyst as a real person involved in a mutually-caring patient-analyst relationship.

    Patient-analyst follow-up may provide numerous positive benefits: the patient may re-experience the analyst’s caring, may re-invigorate helpful introjections of the analyst, and have additional opportunity to deal with unresolved idealization of the analyst. The analyst may learn about the patient’s unpredictable, inevitable post-termination changes, positive and negative, and improve his/her understanding of the course and outcome of treatment.

    JOSEPH SCHACHTER received his Ph.D. from Harvard and M.D. from NYU. He completed his psychoanalytic training at the Columbia University Psychoanalytic Center for Training and Research. He was chair of the IPA Subcommittee on Evaluation of Research Proposals and Results and has published extensively on various topics ranging from neonatal physiology, schizophrenia, and analytic practice and theory. His most recent work is on analytic outcome and contact after analysis.

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •